How to Find Good Paying Audiobook Jobs When You're Just Getting Started as a narrator

[This is Part 2 of a 4-Part Series on Finding Work as a Freelance Audiobook Narrator] 

Other posts in this series: 

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You’ve probably heard me talk about how much money you can earn as an audiobook narrator plenty of times before, but you might be thinking — “That sounds interesting, but how do I actually find work as a narrator? What are the steps, exactly?

Getting Audiobook Work Through ACX

The easiest way to find work as a brand new narrator is to audition for books on ACX.com.

ACX is an Amazon owned company and they provide a platform where authors and publishers can post books that they want to have turned into audiobooks, and narrators can audition for any book they like. If the author likes the audition, they’ll make an offer to the narrator to record the book. All communications between the author and narrator are handled directly through the ACX website. They also handle all of the file transfers, listing the audiobook on Audible and iTunes, sales tracking, royalty payments, and any disputes that may arise between the author and narrator.

I’ve been working through ACX for over two years now and I’m so grateful that this platform exists. It provides so much protection for the narrator. I always know when my deadlines are and I don’t have to worry about getting ripped off or not getting paid by a less than reputable author.

But…

There is one problem — ACX is currently only open to people who live in the United States or the United Kingdom. They will likely open the program up to other countries eventually, but, for now, it’s not an option if you don’t live in the US or the UK.

*Edit- As of June 1st, 2017, ACX is now open to residents of Canada and Ireland as well. 

So does that mean that you can’t narrate audiobooks if you live outside the U.S. or the U.K.?

Nope. There are still options available to you.

ACX Alternatives

Option #1: Work for an established audiobook publisher.

You’ll have to do some research to find out which audiobook publishing houses are available in your country and reach out to find out if they are accepting new narrator demos. If so, you will likely need to create an audio sample for yourself performing a segment from a book. They may provide you with a sample if they have a specific project in mind.

Option #2: Reach out to authors and book publishers directly and offer to narrate their book.

I do this all the time. I simply go onto Amazon.com and search for books in the genres that I like that don’t have an audiobook version yet. Then, I’ll do a google search for the author or check out the author’s profile on Amazon to get their contact information.

If you get an author to agree to a book deal, either you or the author can submit the completed audio files to Author’s Republic (www.authorsrepublic.com) — this is an aggregate audiobook publisher who will submit your book to multiple audiobook retail sites like Audible, iTunes, Audiobooks.com, Overdrive, etc.

Author’s Republic handles the accounting and payout of royalty payments so it is theoretically possible to work out a royalty share deal with the author or publisher. However, under this type of arrangement, it may be a lot easier to work out a flat rate payment deal based on the length of the book.

Option #3: Create a listing on Fiverr.com to record audiobooks

Currently, there are dozens of voice artists and audiobook narrators with listings on Fiverr. All you would need to do is create an account on the site, create an audio sample or two to show off your voice, and offer a per hour or per minute rate. Once you have an account set up, you could reach out to authors directly and use Fiverr as a payment and file transfer gateway.

Option #4: Freelance job sites

Sites like Upwork.com and Freelancer.com often have postings for audiobook narration and voiceover jobs. You’ll have to check often as the listings are always changing, but these sites could be a good source of voice over and audiobook work when you’re just getting started.

What do you think? Do you have questions about getting audiobook jobs as a new narrator? Do you know of any other places to find audiobook jobs? If so, leave a comment below!

Want to learn even more about creating audiobooks?

If you’d like to learn how to break into this growing industry, I’d love to help you get started. I went ahead and put together a free course that covers all the basics of audiobook recording. Click the button below to enroll.